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Slovaks commemorated All Saints Day

PEOPLE throughout Slovakia used this past Saturday and Sunday to visit the graves of their deceased relatives, bringing flowers and lighting candles. Following All Saints Day on November 1, which is a public holiday in Slovakia, All Souls’ Day is commemorated on Sunday.

PEOPLE throughout Slovakia used this past Saturday and Sunday to visit the graves of their deceased relatives, bringing flowers and lighting candles. Following All Saints Day on November 1, which is a public holiday in Slovakia, All Souls’ Day is commemorated on Sunday.

All Souls Day, or the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed, was introduced to follow All Saints Day in the 10th century. Its celebration is based on the Catholic doctrine of purgatory, which states that the souls of the faithful that at death have not been cleansed from venial sins or have not fully atoned for mortal sins cannot yet attain the beatific vision but can be helped to do so by prayer and by the sacrifice of the Holy Mass. On November 2, priests usually appeal to people to repent and to strive to avoid sin, according to TASR.

These holidays probably see the heaviest traffic levels in the whole year, as journeys are not distributed over several days as in the case of Christmas, for example.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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