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Record kite was 175 m long

KOŠICE saw two records broken on October 11. The first took place at an event called Šarkaniáda / Kiteade at the KVP housing estate which saw a competition of kites.

Flying kites is a popular autumn activity. (Source: Sme)

KOŠICE saw two records broken on October 11. The first took place at an event called Šarkaniáda / Kiteade at the KVP housing estate which saw a competition of kites.

The longest one, which measures 175 metres including its tail and was able to fly – this was a precondition for the victory – won and established the Slovak record for the Slovak Records initiative, as Igor Svítok informed the TASR newswire.

The event, organised by the city of Košice and the Kitee šarkany company, was also acknowledged as the biggest kite competition by the Book of Slovak Records, with about 500 participants.

The festival Rozmanitosť / Diversity, which promotes multiculturalism, brought the biggest number of various soups.

Organised by the K 13 – Košice Cultural Centres and the SPOT team in Kasárne/Kulturpark on the same day, the event offered 32 types of soup, about 25 litres of each. Organisers thus got a certificate from the Book of Slovak Records, Svítok told the SITA newswire.

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