Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Another overpriced hospital device

THE SCANDAL involving the purchase of an overpriced CT scanner by Piešťany Hospital could have a competitor that even surpasses the original, according to Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) representatives, the TASR newswire reported on November 10.

THE SCANDAL involving the purchase of an overpriced CT scanner by Piešťany Hospital could have a competitor that even surpasses the original, according to Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) representatives, the TASR newswire reported on November 10.

In August, with the assistance of European funds, the Medical Faculty of Pavol Jozef Šafárik University (UPJŠ) in Košice bought a magnetic resonance device for a price that was one third higher than what Czech Masaryk University in Brno paid for a similar device with higher r.

The magnetic resonance scanner with a resolution of 1.5 Tesla from Siemens cost €3.054 million. The contract stipulates that both installation and service should be carried out by Siemens. Nevertheless, the purchase was carried out via an intermediary, a company called Pharma Group, which is an unknown company based in the village of Veľké Leváre in the Bratislava region, according to former Health Minister Ivan Uhliarik, TASR reported.

Uhliarik pointed out that a certain Czech hospital has bought an MRI scanner with half the resolution for €1.1 million, while Masaryk University spent €1.9 million on a device with a resolution twice as high as the one purchased by UPJŠ.

“That’s still €1 million less than with UPJŠ,” said Uhliarik, as quoted by TASR. “[The university] could have bought three units.”

The public competition was carried out in line with the law and was approved by an agency of Education Ministry for structural funds, UPJŠ Rector Ladislav Mirossay responded, adding that a contract has been signed, but the purchase has not yet taken place, the Sme daily reported.

“We consider comparison of different devices without precise technical specification to be incorrect and misleading,” UPJŠ Medical Faculty spokesperson Jaroslava Oravcová said, as quoted by Sme.


Source: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).