FOCUS IN SHORT

Events not remembered clearly

TWENTY-FIVE years after the remarkable events of November 17, 1989, the knowledge about what actually happened is not perfect even in the Slovak Parliament, where two of six deputies approached by the SITA newswire were able to answer two questions related to November 1989. The deputies were asked what happened on November 16, 1989 in Bratislava and when approximately the first free parliamentary elections took place after the Velvet Revolution. While four answered correctly the first question, only two gave an accurate answer to the second one.

TWENTY-FIVE years after the remarkable events of November 17, 1989, the knowledge about what actually happened is not perfect even in the Slovak Parliament, where two of six deputies approached by the SITA newswire were able to answer two questions related to November 1989. The deputies were asked what happened on November 16, 1989 in Bratislava and when approximately the first free parliamentary elections took place after the Velvet Revolution. While four answered correctly the first question, only two gave an accurate answer to the second one.

“Students of Bratislava’s universities demonstrated in front of the Education Ministry and marched through the city,” Július Brocka from the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) said when answering correctly the first question. “They were earlier than those in Prague.”

Ľudovít Kaník from the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) recalled that Slovak Television brought a shot from the students’ march in its news programme. Miroslav Kadúc from the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) and Lucia Nicholsonová from Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) answered the question correctly, too. Árpád Érsek from Most-Híd said that “certainly there was some protest event”. Jaroslav Baška from Smer did not recollect the march.

Only Brocka and Kaník answered the second question correctly, saying that the election took place in June 1990.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

How a Catholic charity became a voice for migrants in Slovakia

Religious organisations have added leverage in changing perceptions of foreigners and migrants, says Caritas Slovakia.

Caritas Slovakia's ‘World Without “the Other” – Migration Myths’ campaign educates Slovaks on migration in a fun and artistic way.

Secret votes and public lies

There are uncanny echoes today of Slovakia’s agonies over its choice of chief prosecutor ten years ago.

Dobroslav Trnka (left) and Jozef Čentéš (right), the candidate who was eventually selected by MPs in 2011, never got to take up the post because the then president, Ivan Gašparovič refused to appoint him for reasons that were never clearly explained.

Which are the largest law firms in Slovakia?

For the first time, the ranking also provides an overview in partial categories of law.