Smer would win the elections, SaS and SDKÚ out

IF THE parliamentary elections took place in mid-November, they would be won by the ruling Smer party supported by 36.9 percent of voters. Second would be the non-parliamentary Sieť with 11.7 percent, the survey carried out by the Polis polling agency between November 10 and 16 with 1,473 respondents for the SITA newswire showed.

IF THE parliamentary elections took place in mid-November, they would be won by the ruling Smer party supported by 36.9 percent of voters. Second would be the non-parliamentary Sieť with 11.7 percent, the survey carried out by the Polis polling agency between November 10 and 16 with 1,473 respondents for the SITA newswire showed.

The party with the third highest support would be the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) picked by 9 percent of respondents, followed by Most-Híd with 8.7 percent, the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with 7.5 percent and the Party of Hungarian Community (SMK) with 5.6 percent.

This means that Smer would get 70 seats in the parliament, Sieť 22, KDH 17, Most-Híd 16, OĽaNO 14 and SMK 11, SITA wrote.

Current parliamentary parties Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) and the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) would fail to pass the 5-percent threshold as they would get the support of only 4.5 percent and 3 percent of the vote, respectively.

The Slovak National Party (SNS) would get 4.8 percent and NOVA 3.2 percent of votes, SITA wrote.

The survey also showed that 51 percent of the respondents would attend the elections, while 23 percent would not and 26 percent were undecided.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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