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Poll: Slovaks still favour “third way” between socialism and capitalism

As was the case 25 years ago, Slovaks continue to view the so-called third way, or a kind of middle ground between socialism and capitalism, according to a study released November 19. According to Miroslav Tížik, head of a team in charge of the study at the Sociological Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV), the proportion of people who were proponents of the “third way” was 51 percent. The figure was 50 percent in November and December 1989, shortly after the Velvet Revolution that brought about the demise of Communism. The survey was carried out by the Focus agency on a sample of 1,215 respondents between May 29 and June 8, with the output then analysed by the aforementioned institute. “We rejected state bureaucratic socialism in November 1989, and the ideal became the non-totalitarian model of a state such as Sweden or Austria that offered a combination of high standards of living and social certainties," said Tížik, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “People long for this kind of state to this day.” The economic situation was not viewed in an overly negative light, but a different picture is painted when living standards as a whole are considered, including aspects such as social security and the functioning of public authorities.

As was the case 25 years ago, Slovaks continue to view the so-called third way, or a kind of middle ground between socialism and capitalism, according to a study released November 19.

According to Miroslav Tížik, head of a team in charge of the study at the Sociological Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV), the proportion of people who were proponents of the “third way” was 51 percent. The figure was 50 percent in November and December 1989, shortly after the Velvet Revolution that brought about the demise of Communism.

The survey was carried out by the Focus agency on a sample of 1,215 respondents between May 29 and June 8, with the output then analysed by the aforementioned institute.

“We rejected state bureaucratic socialism in November 1989, and the ideal became the non-totalitarian model of a state such as Sweden or Austria that offered a combination of high standards of living and social certainties," said Tížik, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “People long for this kind of state to this day.”

The economic situation was not viewed in an overly negative light, but a different picture is painted when living standards as a whole are considered, including aspects such as social security and the functioning of public authorities.

“Nearly one fifth (18.6 percent) said that their lives are far more difficult now than in 1989, while 26.4 percent said that their lives are a little more difficult,” said Tížik. “Less than 6 percent have far easier lives now than in 1989, while another 12 percent of the respondents said that their lives are a little easier now.”

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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