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Kiska spoke in the parliament

IF THE government can fight the tax evasions with the tax cobra, maybe it is the time to introduce a new cobra for the health-care sector, President Andrej Kiska said during his first speech in parliament on November 26.

IF THE government can fight the tax evasions with the tax cobra, maybe it is the time to introduce a new cobra for the health-care sector, President Andrej Kiska said during his first speech in parliament on November 26.

Kiska asked for the opportunity to speak in front of the MPs in order to comment on current issues, such as the changes in the top parliamentary structures. He was talking mostly about problems in the health-care sector, but he also commented on the Education Ministry. Moreover, the president backed the protests of people against corruption in the health-care sector, the SITA newswire reported.

“In my opinion, it would be good to introduce the special regime in the health-care sector which would bring results,” Kiska said, as quoted by SITA, adding that maybe some kind of health-care cobra would help.

The president assumes that the government, the parliament, tax offices, the police and the judiciary should send a message to the health sector that things will be called by their real names and that the unjustifiable profits of companies and people standing behind the health-care sector will stop.

Kiska further said that many people in Slovakia are probably convinced that the political interests, interests of supplies of medical facilities and interests of insurance companies are the most important in health sector, with the interests of doctors and nurses being after them, and the interests of patients being on the very bottom.

“This is a long-time experience of those who work in the health-care sector and most of us who have encountered them,” Kiska continued, as quoted by SITA.

He considers it understandable and inevitable that there have been so many changes in the government and also the top structures of the parliament.

“I also consider it logical and understandable that the government has prepared changes to rules for companies and suppliers of medical facilities,” Kiska said, as quoted by SITA.

The fact that both the speaker and deputy speaker of parliament resigned from their posts prove that the issue was serious.

Unlike PM Robert Fico, however, Kiska did not criticise the public protests against stealing in the health sector organised by many opposition MPs. He understands that people want to express their opinion over what is happening.

The president also commented on the changes to the Education Ministry, which has its third minister in a short time, as reported by SITA.

The opposition appreciated the fact that Kiska pointed to problems in the health-care and education sectors and backed people protesting in streets, the TASR newswire wrote.

Source: SITA, TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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