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Ex-SaS/NOVA Miškov unveils new party, SKOK

THE SLOVAK Civic Coalition, a new political party known as SKOK for short, is aiming to push for the principles of a free, fair and open society, said Independent MP and former economy minister Juraj Miškov when officially announcing the founding of the party in Bratislava on December 1, the TASR newswire reported.

THE SLOVAK Civic Coalition, a new political party known as SKOK for short, is aiming to push for the principles of a free, fair and open society, said Independent MP and former economy minister Juraj Miškov when officially announcing the founding of the party in Bratislava on December 1, the TASR newswire reported.

Miškov was among five liberals who left the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party last year and later joined the NOVA political movement of Daniel Lipšic and then left NOVA in September as well.

Miškov noted that on Monday it began to collect the signatures that are needed for registration.

“I don’t want to be the right’s master of the house, and I don’t believe that we’ll be saved by a modern messiah who’s been summoned and perhaps even paid for,” Miškov said, as quoted by TASR, referring on Sieť party leader Radoslav Procházka who said back in March that rather than being the leader, he would like to be the right’s “master of the house”.

SKOK aims to be a Slovak civic coalition, or a coalition of citizens, that is not only a standard political party, said its founder.

“We’ll be a centrist, civic-liberal grouping of active people,” Miškov said, as quoted by TASR, “I want expertise to regain its place in public life.”

In addition, SKOK represents a sudden, radical change and is synonymous with the word “reform”. The party will aim to push through substantial changes, he added.

The party’s prep committee features former head of the Parliament Office Michal Nižňan, former SaS MP Kamil Krnáč and Bratislava local councillor Katarína Augustinič. Other defectors from SaS such as Jozef Kollár, Juraj Droba, Daniel Krajcer and Martin Chren have not joined party’s team.

“I’ve made an offer to them to take part – they’d be big added value – but it’s their call,” Miškov said, as quoted by TASR, “I’ll seek to work with them,” added Miškov.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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