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Defence Minister wants new air defence radar

Defence Minister Martin Glváč will report to the cabinet about the situation with current military radar, whose service life is ending and because of EU sanctions against Russia it is not possible to procure replacement parts from Russian manufacturer Almaz Antey.

Defence Minister Martin Glváč will report to the cabinet about the situation with current military radar, whose service life is ending and because of EU sanctions against Russia it is not possible to procure replacement parts from Russian manufacturer Almaz Antey.

The cabinet should discuss a proposed solution to ensure the renovation and operation of radar technology for Slovak armed forces. After last week’s meeting of the National Security Council, Glváč said that the final decision needs to be made by mid-January and the whole situation must be resolved within a year.

Expert discussions are ongoing and several alternatives are open, Glváč said, as quoted by the SITA newswire. One of the companies with Slovakia is negotiating with is the Sweden’s Saab. Saab Group Director for Central and Eastern Europe Tobias Wennberg told SITA that with regard to the needs of Slovak armed forces, they can provide within a few months a provisional solution, by delivering their Giraffe radar system. Talks are also underway about a shared radar with the Czech Republic, which should open a competition for radiolocation technology early next year. Wennberg said that a new radar from any supplier typically costs €11-15 million.

The Defence Ministry is poised to launch an international tender within a month, minister Glváč told the TASR newswire after the government session on December 3. The final price for the radar systems will be determined by the tender.

According to opposition MP Martin Fedor (independent), the Government should seek such options of modernising radar systems so as to not cover the whole cost from state budget. Fedor pointed out that acquisitions of similar equipment were secured in the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary in the past via a NATO agency. Fedor conceded, however, that the situation has changed since then and the Alliance is no longer willing to pay for such projects. What has changed too, however, is the security situation. Glváč reacted that the cabinet is likely to hold talks with NATO about the financing the new radar systems.

(Source: SITA, TASR, Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Topic: Military


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