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Slovakia improves in the corruption index

SLOVAKIA improved its position in the Corruption Perception Index by Transparency International compared to last year. It placed 54th of 175 surveyed countries, up by six places. The placement takes into consideration slightly lower number of surveyed countries compared to 2013, the Transparency International Slovensko (TIS) informed in a press release.

SLOVAKIA improved its position in the Corruption Perception Index by Transparency International compared to last year. It placed 54th of 175 surveyed countries, up by six places. The placement takes into consideration slightly lower number of surveyed countries compared to 2013, the Transparency International Slovensko (TIS) informed in a press release.

Slovakia’s result is the sixth worst among other European Union countries, leaving behind Croatia, Italy, Romania, Bulgaria and Greece.

According to the index, which reflects the level of corruption perception of domestic and foreign analysts and managers, the best situation is in Denmark, New Zealand and Finland, while Somalia, North Korea and Sudan are the most corrupted states.

The improvement of Slovakia was affected mostly by adopting the law on the protection of whistleblowers, stricter rules for financing political parties as well as launching the e-marketplace for state orders. Another positive signal was the departure of Štefan Harabin from top positions in the judiciary, TIS press release reads.

The report however suggests that the test for the adopted measures will be their implementation in practice. Next year politicians will appoint members of the committees which will supervise the financing of campaigns for 2016 elections. The e-marketplace will have to prove that it can lure enough suppliers to offer their bids and that the procurers can purchase the goods and services effectively.

The government also plans to amend the law on free access to information, the crucial legislation for public control. The provisions of the amendment will be another signal whether Slovakia is serious about fighting corruption, according to the press release.

TIS also reminds of the unfulfilled pre-election promise to toughen up the property disclosures of public officials. Moreover, the country would send a good signal also if the parliament elected new chair of the Supreme Audit Office respected by the public.

Source: TIS press release

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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