Entrepreneurs select bureaucratic absurdity of the year

A MEASURE whereby enterprises undergoing bankruptcy have to pay a high fee to a court even though they are going bust has been selected as the biggest bureaucratic anomaly of the year, according to an online survey by the Slovak Young Entrepreneurs Association.

A MEASURE whereby enterprises undergoing bankruptcy have to pay a high fee to a court even though they are going bust has been selected as the biggest bureaucratic anomaly of the year, according to an online survey by the Slovak Young Entrepreneurs Association.

The survey is aimed at identifying meaningless legislative measures that put bureaucratic burdens on entrepreneurs and at drawing the attention of politicians to such measures so that they can be eliminated.

“This year’s selection of bureaucratic absurdities reflected a whole array of problems that entrepreneurs have to cope with in order to be able to run their businesses and meet regulations,” said Ján Solík, chairman of the Slovak Young Entrepreneurs Association, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The second most absurd legislative measure was a regulation whereby all employers are obliged to extend health supervision via setting up a working health service in their firms. Such a service should even carry out supervision of jobs that are least susceptible to danger at the workplace, including administrative ones.

Next came a measure on granting permits to passenger transport companies, including taxi firms. According to the legislation, permits for running a taxi service in a region are granted by the respective district office located in that given region. This means that while taxi drivers with a licence for Bratislava Region are allowed to give lifts to passengers from Bratislava to Nitra, they cannot bring passengers from Nitra to Bratislava if the taxi service does not have a licence from a district office in Nitra Region. Bus companies, for their part, need to ask for approval from all regions through whose territory they transport passengers, even if their buses do not stop in those regions.

The annual survey, which was the third of its kind to be organised by the Slovak Young Entrepreneurs Association, involved a total of 1,002 respondents, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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