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Vandals paint partisan statue pink

AN UNKNOWN vandal in Banská Bystrica painted the statue of partisan participating in the Slovak National Uprising (SNP) pink, the Sme daily reported on January 16.

AN UNKNOWN vandal in Banská Bystrica painted the statue of partisan participating in the Slovak National Uprising (SNP) pink, the Sme daily reported on January 16.

SNP Museum Director Stanislav Mičev pointed out that even such act can be seen as entertainment it should not be underestimated.

“Everything begins somehow,” Mičev told the Sme. “This is one step to the undermining of the SNP. We could take it as a recklessness of youth, but I think it is not.”

The statue is not officially a cultural monument. The damage was estimated at around €10,000 and police began a criminal investigation for damaging property.

The statue was created by sculptor Karol Dúbravský in 1964. It stands on a pedestal, on which statue of Milan Rastislav Štefánik, one of the founders of the Czechoslovak Republic, formerly stood.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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