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Chechen terrorism suspect detained on Slovak-Ukrainian border

On the evening of January 15, police detained a man from Chechnya (aged 32) who is suspected of terrorism in Russia. He was detained around 20:00 at the Slovak-Ukrainian border crossing in Vyšné Nemecké, Police President Tibor Gašpar informed the TASR newswire.

On the evening of January 15, police detained a man from Chechnya (aged 32) who is suspected of terrorism in Russia. He was detained around 20:00 at the Slovak-Ukrainian border crossing in Vyšné Nemecké, Police President Tibor Gašpar informed the TASR newswire.

The man travelled from Slovakia to Ukraine, and during a border check, police discovered through a search within Interpol databases that he has been wanted by the Russian federation for suspicions of terrorism. The international warrant was issued in 2007, and Slovakia requested all due documents concerning the case from the Russian side, Gašpar added.

The police president expects an extradition proceeding to follow, i.e. that the Chechen man will be extradited to Russia. However, as he is also carrying a Swedish passport, the Slovak police are communicating with Swedish partners as well.

Police will investigate the case further.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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