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Government wants explanation from Slovnaft for high fuel prices

Globally, the declining price of crude oil has pushed down the prices of fuel, both petrol and diesel, but in Slovakia prices continue to outpace that of neighbouring countries.

Finance Minister Peter Kažimír and Economy Minister Pavol Pavlis want to meet representatives of the refinery Slovnaft that runs a network of filling stations will have to explain why petrol costs more here, the Sme daily wrote on January 22.

Kažimír said they are curious about how Slovnaft reacts these days to the falling global oil prices and he added that the goal of the planned meeting is to analyse the truth about the way and the pace of lowering the fuel prices. However, he called the media question whether state suspects Slovnaft of reacting inadequately mere speculation, according to Sme. He admitted, however, “a certain disproportion against other countries”.

The ministers are to meet Slovnaft representative some time within the upcoming two weeks, the TASR newswire wrote.

(Source: TASR)

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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