Lajčák: Extremism, not Islam, is problem

SLOVAKIA is ready to take an active part in the process of addressing the problems surrounding religious extremism and terrorism that also hide behind the veneer of Islam, Foreign Minister Miroslav Lajčák said at the meeting with ambassadors from Arabic countries based in Bratislava on January 22, the TASR newswire reported.

In the wake of recent tragic events in Paris and the thwarted terror attack in Belgium, Lajčák and the ambassadors from Egypt, Palestine, Kuwait, Iraq and Libya discussed the issues of political Islam, radicalism and the abuse of Islam by terrorists.

“Terrorism represents one of the gravest threats not only for the Middle East but also for us in Europe and the whole world,” said minister Lajčák, as quoted bz TASR. “In the fight against terrorism, the Western world and Islamic world stand on the same side and only the joint effort can lead to the desired results.”

The defeat of extremism and terrorism is important not only for the protection of countries’ values but also for their identity as civilised societies. Therefore, the need to communicate together is stronger now than ever, he added.

Terrorism and extremism are not the issue of Islam as a religion but are rather linked to globalisation, migration and social problems. Slovakia rejects any racial or religious intolerance, radicalism and fundamentalism as well as the linking of terrorism to Islam, Lajčák underlined.

“Terrorism isn’t a one-way street that leads from the Middle East to the West. It is the Muslim countries that are most affected by it,” said Lajčák, as quoted by TASR.

Source: TASR


Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
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