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This year, Overdose will fertilise mares in Germany

FAMOUS former racing sprinter Overdose who has mainly represented Zltán Mikóczy from Dunajská Streda at hippodromes worldwide, will in 2015 become the studhorse in the German stud-farm Lindehof of Volker Linde.

Overdose with Zoltán Mikóczy(Source: Petitpress)

The rate for breeders of brood-mares will be €4,000, the SITA newswire quoted the Turf-Rimes website. Last year, Overdose made his debut as something of a Hungarian national stud-horse in Dióspuszta, in the breeding centre Angol Telivér Ménes. There, he impregnated 38 mares. The basic fee was €3,500 but there were some rebates possible, up to 90 percent.

Overdose, already 10 years old, of British origin, was bought by Mikóczy at a Newmarket auction in November 2006 as one-year-old for a mere 2,000 pounds (cca €3,000). However, he managed 14 victories and earned €258,492. Now, Galopp Online website called him a cult horse in its headline. He had a series of victories but later, he experienced health issues – returning to the racecourses in 2010.

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