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CULTURE IN SHORT

Three Slovaks to be at Italian art fair

THE ITALIAN international fair of modern and contemporary art, Arte Fiera, takes place between January 22 and 26. The art fair in Bologna also hosts works of Slovak artists.

Rastislav Podoba: The end of the garden.(Source: Courtesy of Krokus Gallery )

THE ITALIAN international fair of modern and contemporary art, Arte Fiera, takes place between January 22 and 26. The art fair in Bologna also hosts works of Slovak artists.

“Our gallery presents three artists in a premiere participation at this event,” Gabriela Kisová of the Bratislava-based Krokus gallery informed. “They are Svätopluk Mikyta, Dezider Tóth and Rastislav Podoba.”

She described the fair as the oldest and biggest one in Italy – founded in 1974 – and one of the most important in Europe.

Dezider Tóth, aka Monogramista T. D., has been an important representative of the conceptual art since the 1970s. Svätopluk Mikyta lectures at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Brno and makes installations, drawings, and ceramics. Painter Rastislav Podoba works at the Academy of Arts in Banská Bystrica.

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