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Siemens eyes Slovak material

POLYSTON is the name of Slovak, Badín-based company, but also of the material they developed 15 years ago.

In October 2014, the company launched construction of a new technology park, and is planning to expand production and recruit employees.

“The construction should be finished in summer 2015,” representative of the company Polyston, Ivan Koša, told the Hospodárske Noviny daily. “Fifteen new people will work here, while now we have about 30 employees,” he said, adding that the investment is worth €2.2 million which was supported also by the state – the government allocated half the amount from EU funds.

As the glue is not visible, it is good to use polyston for various atypical forms of rooms and apartments. The company built a laboratory for nuclear medicine in Kuala Lumpur, for example.

“This year [2014], we made the canteen for the Škoda Doosan factory in Pilsen, for 800 people,” Koša said. “We are working on further orders.”

Currently, the Polyston company is negotiating an order for one of the biggest electronics company worldwide, Siemens; it also should produce for casinos or bars on huge cruise ships. It has most clients in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Germany.

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