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Constitutional Court refused President Kiska’s proposal

Slovak President Andrej Kiska has repeatedly contested at the Constitutional Court (CC) the alleged bias of its justice Jana Baricová – whom he personally picked for the position – in connection with her role to decide over the complaints of three unsuccessful candidates for the CC post whom Kiska refused to appoint last year due to lack of experience.

Slovak President Andrej Kiska has repeatedly contested at the Constitutional Court (CC) the alleged bias of its justice Jana Baricová – whom he personally picked for the position – in connection with her role to decide over the complaints of three unsuccessful candidates for the CC post whom Kiska refused to appoint last year due to lack of experience.

Of the six candidates picked by the ruling Smer party, Kiska chose only Baricová, while refusing Eva Fulcová, Ján Bernát, Juraj Sopoliga, Miroslav Ďuriš and – nominated later – Imrich Volkai.

The president claimed that their complaints go against her appointment, the Sme daily wrote on January 24.

Moreover, Kiska also wants Baricová to testify in the case as a witness which means that she cannot be there as a judge, Kiska’s advisor Ján Mazák said for the Sme daily. The CC, however, has turned down his complaints.

The panel of Peter Brňák does not think Baricová is biased, and Baricová herself does not want to be excluded. Kiska says that the court ruled on something he had not actually objected, instead of evaluating his arguments.

(Source: Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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