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SOPK: Businesses expect 2015 to be worse than 2014

Entrepreneurs evaluated their own economic results from 2014 in a more negative light than a year earlier and, thus, their expectations for 2015 are significantly more pessimistic, according to the latest survey conducted by the Slovak Trade and Industry Chamber (SOPK).

“The predictions for 2015 expect a decrease in six indicators out of seven,” Ladislav Vaškovič of SOPK said January 27 at the ongoing Expected Development of Slovak Economy in 2015 conference. “That means that their expectations in 2013 were more positive than at the end of 2014. In the meantime, their estimates have surely been coupled with a more realistic prospectus.” The only exception to the trend is export, where respondents’ expectations recorded year-on-year improvement, he added as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Almost a half of respondents declared that they plan to use European funds in the new programming period of 2014-20. “That amounts to a slight y-o-y drop,” Vaškovič said. “The statistics show that usually half of the members have a long-term interest in making use of the European funds.”

Similarly to the previous year, a total of 54 percent of businessmen claimed that they have sufficient information about European funds. It is 84 percent of respondents who believe that the process of acquiring these resources is non-transparent. “Only a small percentage consider the process transparent and that number is continually shrinking,” added Vaškovič.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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