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MPs override veto on temporary employment law

PARLIAMENT overrode the president’s veto and passed again the amendment to the Labour Code based on which the conditions for temporary employment will become stricter as of March. President Andrej Kiska returned the bill objecting to, among other things, what he said were inappropriately evaluated impacts of the changes on employment and job creation.

PARLIAMENT overrode the president’s veto and passed again the amendment to the Labour Code based on which the conditions for temporary employment will become stricter as of March. President Andrej Kiska returned the bill objecting to, among other things, what he said were inappropriately evaluated impacts of the changes on employment and job creation.

The president also took into consideration the opinion of employers who fear the inappropriate increase in their costs and the bureaucracy, the SITA newswire reported on January 28.

The amendment introduces the so-called shared responsibility principle. This means that temporary employees must earn the same salary as regular employees if they both do the same work. If a temporary employee earns less, the agency would have to pay the difference from its own budget. If the agency fails to cover this cost, the difference would have to be paid by the company.

Another important change includes the so-called presumption of temporary assignment. This means that if a company signs a contract with another firm operating in the same sector or field, rather than with an employment agency, and the work meets the criteria of temporary employment, it will be considered a temporary assignment and the employer will have to follow the rules set by the law for temporary employment.

Additionally, the amendment bans temporary assignments for hazardous work classified in the highest category, and sets a 24-month cap on the maximum period of time that a temporary employee can work for the same firm.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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