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Most graduates do not work in their field

ABOUT every second university graduate has never worked in the specialisation he or she studied. 

(Source: SME)

Moreover, as much as 20 percent of those who work do not even need the university diploma. This stems from the revelations of the Education Ministry published on February 9, the Sme daily reported.

“The number of students for whom there is no space in the labour market is increasing,” Education Minister Juraj Draxler said, as quoted by Sme.

The data were collected in the survey carried out by the Slovak Centre of Scientific and Technical Information (CVTI) last year, attended by more than 15,000 graduates with the second university degree who left school since 2008. The data were also provided by the state-run social insurer Sociálna Poisťovňa.

The published data also suggest that there are big differences between the salaries of university graduates. A graduate from the Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies of the Slovak University of Technology (STU) in Bratislava may earn €1,000 per month more than a graduate of theology at the Catholic University in Ružomberok or a graduate of pedagogy at the University of Matej Bel in Banská Bystrica.

Moreover, the chance for graduates from informatics and electrotechnics to find a job in the field is 100 percent, Sme wrote.

Among the graduates who find good jobs are those of big universities, such as STU, the Comenius University in Bratislava and the University of Economics in Bratislava. The graduates from social and humanitarian studies are less successful.

“It is necessary to create a mechanism that would remove the extremes,” Draxler said, as quoted by Sme, adding that the specialisations whose graduates report weak job placement will not be financed.

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