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Kiska, rectors and ESET open new research centre

PRESIDENT Andrej Kiska along with rector of the local Slovak Technical University (STU)  Robert Redhammer, rector of Comenius University (UK) Karol Mičieta and ESET’s CEO Richard Marko opened a new  research centre opened in Bratislava on February 17.

President Kiska (centre)at the opening of research centre. (Source: Courtesy of ESET)

The centre is a joint project of Slovak virus protection software company ESET, the STU and UK. On the premises of the Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies of STU, students of both universities will be provided with consultations when preparing various scientific projects and with facilities for carrying out experiments in the field of information security.

A voluntary course introducing reverse engineering will also be taught at the centre.

“ESET uses reverse engineering mainly to discover viruses and other harmful codes,” Juraj Macho, ESET’s director of research and development and the centre’s director, told the TASR newswire. “It’s applicable in other fields of information technology as well, however, such as the analysis and optimisation of the quality or reliability of codes.”

The course will be open to students of STU’s Faculty of Electronics and Informatics, its Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies and UK’s Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics.

Both rectors and the ESET CEO signed a memorandum on cooperation. The company at its Bratislava central office and Košice branch employs many graduates of these faculties who are working not only on improving harmful code detection but also on the architecture of anti-virus software.

Kiska stressed his pride to be also a graduate of the STU’s Faculty of Electronics, while also pointing to the connection between research and practice improving the training of future experts.

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