Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak Telekom will pinpoint traffic jams – for millions

THE TRANSPORT Ministry has ordered a new system, including a website, to inform about current traffic situations. 

Traffic jams may be avoided in the future. (Source: Sme)

A public tender regarding IT information was won by Slovak Telekom, and the website should be in operation in less than a year.

The new information system for drivers and passengers shall be created and operated for €21 million, the Denník N daily wrote.

“There will be information about the smoothness of traffic, closures, accidents, limitations, bypasses, road repairs – everything and all, including the passable  or non-passable roads,” Transport Minister Ján Počiatek said when announcing the National System of Traffic Information and the tender.

The minister expects the novelty to bring information and serve not only traditional drivers, but also those who are going to travel by train, airplane or city public transport.    

Slovak Telekom has not yet specified what will be offered for the millions. “In general, these will be items of information about traffic and traffic situations,” company spokesman Martin Vidan said for Denník N. “Their specific extent will be the result of an analysis.” 

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).