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Police examining Gorilla trace, experts do not expect breakthrough

THE NATIONAL Criminal Agency (NAKA) is scrutinising assets of people allegedly connected with the infamous Gorilla file, a purported transcript of recorded talks between top Slovak politicians and businessmen in an intelligence service safe house back in 2010-2011.

The Gorilla protests have faded since March.(Source: SME)

The Gorilla document was reportedly made by the Slovak intelligence service (SIS) describing its operations which sought to collect information on the Penta financial group’s influence on senior Slovak politicians between 2005 and 2006.

The investigators are interested in the standard of living of former politicians Ivan Mikloš, Pavol Rusko, Pavol Prokopovič, Jirko Malchárek and Anna Bubeníková, the Hospodárske noviny daily reported. Police Corps Presidium spokesman Martin Waldl has confirmed for the daily that in association with checking some information in the Gorilla team they have asked for property returns of 18 constitutional and public officials. The investigators, however, did not want to elaborate on specific names.

Read also: Read also:Gorilla file appears to be authentic

The police asked the parliamentary conflict of interest committee for property returns from 2005 and 2006, and also the information on assets of their closest relatives; the committee complied with the police request. Former MPs, cabinet ministers and officials of the National Property Fund (FNM) from the era of the second government of Mikuláš Dzurinda are involved, according to committee head Alojz Přidal. Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said he knows about the investigation, but that he is not going to get involved in any way.

The SIS has so far not confirmed the authenticity of the Gorilla file. Police have been investigating the case since 2012. The politicians whose names are mentioned as those to be checked more closely showed no emotions and either refused to comment or said they had nothing to hide. Slovak politicians are obliged to hand over their property returns, and those of their spouses and minor children sharing the household with them.

Former investigator Jaroslav Šátek opined for Hospodárske noviny that the first logical step by investigators would be to confirm that the information from the Gorilla file is authentic, and expressed doubt about whether public will ever learnt the truth in this case, mostly because of political interests and bias of current politicians.  

Topic: Corruption & scandals

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