Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak NGOs ask for re-evaluation of nuclear programme in Ukraine

UKRAINE is prolonging the lifespan of its 15 nuclear reactors from the Soviet era without a public environmental impact assessment (EIA) – thereby violating international law.

Environment Minister Peter Žiga (L)(Source: SITA)

The first two reactors got their licences prolonged without an EIA, while two more reactors will be prolonged this year; one of them probably in a few weeks, Slovak non-governmental organisations wrote in a memo. The whole project, with serious impacts and questionable benefit, is supported by the European bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBOR) and Eurat (European Association for Nuclear Energy) from public resources. NGOs from Slovakia and neighbouring countries ask their governments to enable citizens to comment on the nuclear project – in compliance with international law.

CEE Bankwatch Network, Človek v ohrození / People in Perils, Greenpeace Slovensko, VIA IURIS and Zelená koalícia  (The Green Coalition) on March 23 filed a motion with the Environmental Ministry to organise a cross-border assessment of the impacts of prolonging the lifespan of Ukrainian reactors according to the Treaty from Espoo.

Similar calls were delivered to their due governments and organisations in neighbouring EU countries – Hungary, Romania and Slovenia. CEE Bankwatch called also on the EBOR and European Commission representatives to guarantee the observance of rights in projects financed from public resources.

“In one month, there will be the anniversary of the accident a Chernobyl , and we do not want a similar incident to be repeated,” Dana Mareková, CEE Bankwatch Network – following the use of EU development finances in Slovakia, said. ”Already prolonging the lifespan of reactors in Rivne has violated international law; and thus, it is necessary that these institutions require cross-border consultations in our name.” 

Topic: Ukraine


Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).