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President’s Office pays €60,000 in compensation to Čentéš

THE OFFICE of President Andrej Kiska will pay financial compensation plus court fees to prosecutor Jozef Čentéš in line with the verdict of the Constitutional Court, which found former president Ivan Gašparovič violated  Čentéš's rights.

Jozef Čentéš(Source: Sme)

In December 2014, the senate of the Constitutional Court invalidated the decision of Gašparovič from December 28, 2012, not to appoint Čentéš – who was appointed by parliament in June 2011 – as prosecutor-general, ruling that Čentéš' fundamental rights were violated. Furthermore, the court ordered that Čentéš should receive €60,000 in compensation, a sum that has to be paid by the end of March, TASR reported.

The President’s Office budget was not drafted with such an expenditure in mind and it has asked the Finance Ministry for an extraordinary one-time financial subsidy.

“The Finance Ministry complied with the request,” said President’s Office spokesman Roman Krpelan.

Gašparovič called upon Kiska to protect the office budget by turning to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg to evaluate whether or not the Constitutional Court arrived at an appropriate verdict.

“If he (Kiska) won't do this, I will, as a participant in the procedure,” Gašparovič told TASR, adding that Kiska should deposit the money and pay out only if an adverse decision is reached by the European court.   

Čentéš had already announced that he will donate the money to charity.

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