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RegioJet threatens with cancelling trains

PRIVATE Czech carrier RegioJet announced its plans to increase the number of trains on the Bratislava-Košice route. 

(Source: SME)

However, it warns against the total cancellation of the train connection if the government does not give it money it currently pays for discounts for students and pensioners.

The company alleges that the country discriminates against the private carrier since it covers the full fares of students and seniors traveling by the trains operated by state-run passenger carrier ZSSK, the Hospodárske Noviny daily wrote.

Most recently, however, the company announced it wants its IC trains on the Bratislava-Košice route to ride in three-hour intervals, which will also result in increasing the number of trains from three to six.

“RegioJet has already asked for increasing the capacities for the train transport schedule for next year, which will become valid this December,” said Radim Jančura, head of RegioJet, as quoted by Hospodárske Noviny. “It will however depend on the government whether it will re-assess its decisions which absolutely smashed the market environment.”

RegioJet allegedly asks the Transport Ministry for €50,000 a month, the Denník N daily wrote.

The ministry, however, does not consider further changes to discounts on Slovak railways.

“Of course, if there is a real need to modify the system, we will re-assess it,” ministry spokesman Martin Kóňa told Hospodárske Noviny.

Topic: Transport


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