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Poll: NKÚ head Mitrík is a representative of Smer, not opposition

THE RECENTLY appointed head of the Supreme Audit Office(NKÚ), Karol Mitrík, is a representative of the ruling Smer party. This is the answer of 48.9 percent of respondents in a poll of the Polis Slovakia agency.

Karol Mitrík (R) takes over as NKÚ head from the hands of Parliamentary Speaker Peter Pellegrini(Source: SITA)

People answered the question: “Do you think that the newly elected chair of the Supreme Audit Office Karol Mitrík is a representative of opposition in his post, or rather the ruling Smer?” According to 48.9 percent of respondents, he is a representative of Smer; out of that figure, 24.5 percent opine that Mitrík is “rather a representative of Smer than of opposition” and 24.4 percent are convinced that “he is definitely a representative of Smer”. 

The phone poll carried out between May 21 and 23 on 902 respondents was conducted with Polis Slovakia by the SITA newswire.

Mitrík has been deemed as a representative of opposition by 25.8 percent of respondents; of which 12.8 percent said that Mitrík is “definitely a representative of opposition” and 13 percent opined that he is “rather a representative of opposition than Smer”. In total 6.8 percent of those polled say that Mitrík is nobody’s representative, and 18.5 percent could not answer this question.

Asked: “Whose candidate should be elected for the NKÚ head post – an opposition one, or a ruling party’s one?”, 40.1 percent said that the NKÚ head should be an opposition candidate. According to 8.8 percent of those polled, he should be the candidate of a ruling party or coalition, and 23.3 percent claimed he should be independent of political parties. A total of 27.8 percent could not answer, SITA wrote.

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