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Just 27 percent of Slovaks happy with their salary

MORE than two-thirds of Slovaks believe that their salary is too low, while only 27 percent of Slovaks are satisfied with their pay, according to a recent survey by the STEM/MARK agency for HomeCredit released on July 22.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme - Peter Žákovič)

It also implies that less than one-half of employees have the courage to ask for a raise, with most of them in for disappointment anyway, because their requests are either turned down or the actual raise is lower than they wanted.

HomeCredit analyst Michal Kozub, however, voiced some optimism for the future. “The crisis is ending, and companies are not only beginning to take on new workers, but they’re actually willing to give better remuneration to their current employees,” Kozub said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “A rise in real salaries is to be expected while consumer prices shouldn’t grow.”

Employees in industry have the best prospects for a pay-rise while the opposite seems to be true for those in retail. The largest share of people – more than 75 percent – who see their salaries as unfair was found in manufacturing and industry.

“Obviously, lower salaries bring in feelings of frustration and of being undervalued,” according to Kozub. 

It was people with the lowest salaries – those receiving less than €350 per month – who demanded the biggest pay-rise, as 32 percent of them would be happy with an extra €200-500.

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