Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Police in New Zealand shot down Slovak wanted for armed robberies

NEW Zealand police officers in Auckland shot down, on the night of Sunday, August 2, a Slovak citizen, aged 21, who had been wanted for three armed robberies in the area.

Police on the site(Source: NZHeerland, Bradley Ambrose)

Police shot at Dávid Červeň in Myers Park after he threatened to use a firearm. However, police were not able to confirm whether he really had a gun, as one was not found. Police claim Červeň had called them to the park, on Sunday at 19:23. After unarmed officers arrived, he told them he was armed, and so they summoned their armed colleagues. Police claim they tried to reason with the man, but in vain; and they started shooting at 19:45, when he “showed” he wanted to use the gun. He died instantly, the SITA newswire wrote.

One of two witnesses who testified in the case said that police closed in on Červeň, called on him to give up and not to move. The young man did not move, but police started to fire, the Sme daily wrote.

Chief of the Auckland police, Richard Chambers, defended the police action, stating that they did everything they could considering the information they had. They shot repeatedly, but it is not known how many times. Part of the investigation will also be video footage from CCTV cameras that recorded the entire incident.

Červeň arrived to New Zealand on March 20 and had a 12-month visa for a working holiday. His family was informed in assistance of Interpol, Slovak honorary consul Peter Kiely told SITA, adding that he does not know where the man worked or lived, but he was in New Zealand as one of the 100 young people taking part in the popular working holidays programme.

On August 2, local police published his photo as a wanted person, in connection with three armed robberies in spirits shops, while evidence from one of them proved him guilty. However, no firearm was used in the robberies, according to police; instead, he seems to have used a knife.

The Stuff.co.nz. website writes that the Slovak came from Dolný Kubín and had friends in New Zealand, as well as a girlfriend. The information stems form his friend who wanted to stay anonymous and who described him as a friendly, decent, shy person. The only explanation he can figure out is Červeň was suffering from depression, Sme wrote. He underwent knee surgery and could not train kickboxing – which was his source of income. Twice, Červeň placed third at the World Championship of juniors in Beograd, and was European Champion in amateur competitions in Hungary, Switzerland, Ukraine and Poland, according to Sme.    

Top stories

How to sell Slovak books to English readers

Slovak literature makes it to the big bookstores of London, but it is unlikely to become a bestseller yet.

On Wednesday, Slovak literature will be presented in one of the biggest bookstores in London. Among the new books translated into English is also the anthology of current Slovak prose selected and translated by Magdalena Mullek and Júlia Sherwood.

EC: Focus on education and labour market

Some recommendations remain the same as last year.

Illustrative stock photo

No Slovaks among the victims of Manchester attack so far

The representatives of Slovakia have expressed their sympathy to the families of the victims.

Police guard close to the Manchester Arena in Manchester, Britain, on May 23, 2017, a day after an explosion.

Slovak paralympic athletes win gold and bronze at World Championship

Three Slovaks became world champions in table tennis in the TM2 category at the World Paralympic Championship in Bratislava.

L-R: Ján Riapoš, Martin Ludrovský in the Slovakia-Taiwan match at the paralympic world championship, May 19.