Non-traditional sports find their feet in Slovakia

SLOVAKIA is a nation keen on sports with a zest for individual disciplines fuelled by the sound results of Slovak athletes.

American football in Slovakia. American football in Slovakia. (Source: Courtesy of Bratislava Monarchs)

This was proven in 2002 when Slovak ice hockey players became the world champions as well as with each gold medal won by white-water athletes, or recently by the excellent performance of cyclist Peter Sagan at the Tour de France.

Yet along with broadly popular sports like hockey, soccer or cycling there are many sports that do not have such a deep-rooted tradition here in Slovakia. In spite of this, Slovak athletes have been achieving sound results in them or practicing them either to improve their health or to just have a good time. There are teams playing rugby, American football as well as lacrosse, baseball and ball hockey, in which Slovaks actually defended their position of world masters in late June. Many young people train in martial arts to keep fit and get rid of stress. New trends in fitness, such as crossfit and street workout, are closely followed in Slovakia, too.

Read also:American football catching on in SlovakiaRead more 

What history do these sports have in Slovakia? How popular are they in Slovakia and what is their potential and ambitions? To find answers to these questions The Slovak Spectator has prepared a series of articles about less traditional sports, at least from the Slovak point of view. 

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Former state secretary describes the corruption at courts

Schools will definitely not open on Monday. Coronavirus vaccine could be available starting in mid-December. Slovakia joins campaign to fight violence against women.

The Presidential Palace lit in orange, to support the Orange the world! campaign.

One in five women has experienced violence

The situation is far from satisfactory, said President Čaputová.

Secret votes and public lies

There are uncanny echoes today of Slovakia’s agonies over its choice of chief prosecutor ten years ago.

Dobroslav Trnka (left) and Jozef Čentéš (right), the candidate who was eventually selected by MPs in 2011, never got to take up the post because the then president, Ivan Gašparovič refused to appoint him for reasons that were never clearly explained.

How a Catholic charity became a voice for migrants in Slovakia

Religious organisations have added leverage in changing perceptions of foreigners and migrants, says Caritas Slovakia.

Caritas Slovakia's ‘World Without “the Other” – Migration Myths’ campaign educates Slovaks on migration in a fun and artistic way.