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Prosecution in wiretapping case halted

PROSECUTOR Jozef Čentéš halted the criminal prosecution in the case of wiretapping journalists of the Pravda daily by the now-defunct Military Defence Intelligence (VOS). 

Jozef Čentéš(Source: Sme)

The case surfaced in 2011 when the Defence Ministry was led by current MP for Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) Ľubomír Galko. At the time, someone published records from the wiretapping of phone conversations of Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák with a reporter of Pravda, Vanda Vavrová. Later it turned out that counter-intelligence also monitored additional people, including ex-director of the TA3 news channel Michal Gučík. Altogether the rights of about 20 people were violated, according to Pravda.

Read also: Read also:Wire-tapped media case leads to suits

The case resulted in Galko losing his post. He was replaced by then-prime minister Iveta Radičová.

The police accused former VOS head Pavel Brychta of initiating the wiretapping based on fabricated reasons in order to follow their contact with representatives of Smer. Also an additional four VOS agents were charged. Čentéš, however, claimed that this has not been proved by the investigation, Pravda reported.

Though he stopped the prosecution, Čentéš claimed in his statement that he will take action on other crimes for which VOS agents are accused, but failed to specify them.

People whose rights were violated in the case can now file a complaint against Čentéš’ decision. Such complaints will then be scrutinised by General Prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár, Pravda wrote.

Topic: Corruption & scandals


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