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New school year begins

NEARLY 2,250 primary and more than 850 secondary schools open their doors on September 2.

(Source: T. Somogyi)

While the Education Ministry expects that the primary schools will be visited by 433,974 pupils, it predicts that 229,616 pupils will attend secondary schools. The school year will have 191 teaching days, the Sme daily reported.

The students should expect several changes which will impact mostly primary schools. One of them is that there will be more maths and Slovak language lessons. First-grade pupils will have at least four lessons of maths a week and nine lessons of Slovak language a week.

Moreover, pupils attending four-year and eight-year grammar schools will have more maths and natural science subjects, the SITA newswire wrote.

In addition, older pupils will get more crafts and cooking lessons, while ninth-grade pupils will also have music lessons. Several teachers, however, criticise this plan since pupils may not like it, as reported by Sme.

Another change concerns the dual education, within which companies should cooperate with schools in vocational education of pupils. They will have to undergo their practical training directly in companies. Moreover, pupils will be able to receive scholarships based on their average marks in those specialisations which are required in the labour market, SITA wrote.

The Education Ministry also introduced eight new specialisations at secondary vocational schools.

An additional change is that pupils of the last grade of the secondary schools will have more time to complete the tests which are part of their school-leaving exams. Regarding  Slovak language and literature, Hungarian language and Literature, and Ukrainian language and literature they will have 100 minutes instead of 90 minutes, and in case of maths they will have 150 minutes instead of 120 minutes, SITA wrote.

Topic: Education


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