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Troop movements to start in Slovakia as part of “Slovak Shield” exercise

LARGE-SCALE troop movements will occur on Slovak soil in the coming days as part of a military exercise called Slovak Shield.  

US’ Black Hawk during a military training at Lešť base.(Source: Sme)

“Next week, we’ll see large-scale troop movements across almost all of Slovakia,” Pavel Macko, second deputy to the Chief of the General Staff of the Slovak Armed Forces told the TASR newswire on September 9. Heavy military equipment from Trebišov and Prešov, both in the east of Slovakia, will be transported to the Lesť military training facility (in Banská Bystrica Region) by train, and some 4,000 soldiers will take part in the exercise.

640 US soldiers and 150 pieces of military equipment, including Stryker and Humvee vehicles, will also participate in Slovak Shield, which is slated for September 14-17. American troops are heading from their base in Vilseck, Germany, through the Czech Republic and Slovakia to Hungary, where they are due to take part in the NATO exercise Brave Warrior 2015.

”These troop movements represent a great opportunity to test our capabilities at a relatively low cost,” said Milan Maxim,Chief of the General Staff, as quoted by TASR.

As well as Slovak and US troops, the exercise will also involve the participation of soldiers from Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, and observers from Germany and Turkey.

Topic: Military


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