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Psychiatrist apologises to Harabin

PSYCHIATRIST Renáta Papšová has apologised to former Supreme Court president Štefan Harabin for the statement connecting him to the deaths of two Supreme Court judges.

Štefan Harabin(Source: SME)

As a result, Harabin withdrew a lawsuit against her for what he called slander, in which he sought €100,000 in damages. He is, however, still suing the public-service broadcaster Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS) for broadcasting the discussion attended by Papšová as part of its investigative journalism programme Reportéri in May 2012, asking for an additional €200,000, the TASR newswire reported.

“As a physician I can say that sometimes illnesses are contagious and our judiciary is ill,” Papšová told public-service broadcaster Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS) in April 2012. “Juraj Majchrák became ill and so did JUDr Lauková, who in the same way died from tough persecution by doctor Harabin.”

Read also: Read also:Harabin in court against public broadcaster

Papšová was the treating physician of the late Marta Lauková, a judge who died of a serious health conditions, as well as of Juraj Majchrák, a one-time vice president of the Supreme Court, who committed suicide.

Harabin and Papšová agreed to an out-of-court settlement on September 7. In the apology shown to the media, the psychiatrist said that her statement was manipulated and broadcast without her permission, as reported by TASR.

Since Papšová initiated the agreement, Harabin will not demand any compensation from her. She will, however, have to pay the costs and court fee.

Regarding RTVS, Harabin told the media he is willing to make a deal with the broadcaster as well. He however insists on RTVS paying the money which he intends to give to charity, TASR wrote. 

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