Incubator opened to help start-ups

A NEW Hungarian-Slovak incubator, Pócsmegyer, which will support micro as well as small and medium-sized start-ups, is up and running from September 2015.

(Source: Sme)

The project to support enterprise between Hungary and Slovakia was initiated by the Italian-Slovak Chamber of Commerce (TSOK) with its Hungarian partner.

“The task of the incubator is to enable entrepreneurs to successfully launch and enhance business activities in both countries and to boost business relations among strategic partners,” general secretary of the TSOK, Giorgio Dovigi, told the TASR newswire. The goal of the project, which is co-financed by the EU under the European Regional Development Fund covering cross-border cooperation between Slovakia and Hungary, is to improve the border region’s competitiveness.

The incubator, which offers a total space of 1,433 square metres, can be the residence of a start-up for its first one to five years. As the cost effectiveness of the incubator’s operation is crucial, the space is of a “co-working” type, meaning several businesses share the same rooms in turns.

TSOK and its Hungarian counterpart, BCE Innovációs Központ Nonprofit Kft, also view the centre as an inspirational space for those establishing new businesses or building start-up projects.

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Theme: Foreigners in Slovakia


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