Law on protests is not going to change

EXTREMISTS are already preparing their third protest pertaining to the migration crisis, and this will again take place in Gabčíkovo village. Municipalities, however, lack the tools to ban marches even if they knew in advance that they might be risky, the Sme daily reported on September 17. 

(Source: Sme)

„The assembly law does not correspond to the 21st century and ties the self-government’s hands,” Nora Gubková, spokesperson for the mayor of the Bratislava’s Old Town district said, as quoted by Sme.

Read also:Concert of solidarity and protest against islamisation coincided in Bratislava Read more 

Prime Minister Robert Fico promised a change to the law in June of this year. He even admitted that it could go to parliament in an expedited procedure. The Interior Ministry, however, refused to specify the date of the changes on September 16.

Under the current law a municipality can ban a rally only if it is aimed at the oppression of human rights. It is however enough for extremists to simply write that the purpose of the action is to inform people, according to Gubková.

Municipalities can ban a march also if its purpose is to incite people to commit violence. The protest against the Islamization of Europe which was held in Bratislava in June this year showed that participants committed violence even without being incited to it, mainly after the official program ended.

Read also:Bratislava anti-migrant protest blocked bicycle race Read more 

 

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