Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Transport Ministry withdraws the Construction Act

SLOVAKIA will have to wait for a new Construction Act as Transport Minister Ján Počiatek withdrew it from parliament, even though it had advanced to the second reading.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

He did so after opposition criticised its content.

“We will try to achieve consensus as I think this law is important and should not be the subject of primitive political discussions, as it was showed by MP [Igor] Hraško,” Počiatek said, as quoted by the SITA newswire, adding that everybody is free to attend further discussion.

Read also: Read also:Additional legalisation of buildings to be possible only in special cases

Počiatek responded to the 25-page amending proposal of the draft Construction Act Hraško submitted to the parliament. According to him, the draft was not good, which was proved by many comments from professional organisations, as reported by SITA.

The new Construction Act was due to come into force on July 1, 2016, and substitute the current valid law which dates back to 1976. Its aim was to accelerate construction and increase effectiveness. 

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).