Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

12,000 people have sought help from banking ombudswoman

THE BANKING ombudswoman's office has been approached by more than 12,000 people since becoming established in 2007. It has also handled a total of 2,039 complaints regarding banking conduct over the same period.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: Sme)

As many as 2,564 people filed 431 official complaints to the office last year. Eighty-five cases were resolved in favour of the bank clients.

“Solutions often don’t consist of just favourable outcomes of the submissions, but we managed to help many people out by giving them advice,” said banking ombudswoman Eva Černá, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The business sector accounted for only 1 percent of all complaints to the banking ombudswoman’s office which was established by the Slovak Banking Association.

“We’ve always been here for ordinary people,” Černá said, as quoted by TASR. “We’re a free service, particularly for people who can't afford lawyers.”

Consumers most frequently complain about difficulties with their loans, most notably over efforts aimed at early redemption of their mortgages following recent falls in interest rates. Assistance from the ombudsman’s office is also sought by people who are experiencing difficulties in repaying their loan instalments or having their debts restructured, TASR wrote. 

Topic: Finances and Advisory


Top stories

EC scrutinises state aid for Jaguar Photo

There is a question whether the scrutiny may impact the carmaker’s plans to invest in Slovakia.

The construction site of a brand new plant of Jaguar Land Rover near Nitra.

Vote-buying scandal lands village mayor in court

Some Roma claiming the mayor of Gemerská Poloma, Miroslav Michalka was buying votes, have changed their testimonies.

Stanislav Kučerák (blue shirt) is a key witness in the vote-buying case.

Police president refuses the proposals of students

He turned down their suggestions for a public debate but invites them to talk about corruption at the Police Corps Presidium.

Police President Tibor Gašpar

How to sell Slovak books to English readers

Slovak literature makes it to the big bookstores of London, but it is unlikely to become a bestseller yet.

On Wednesday, Slovak literature will be presented in one of the biggest bookstores in London. Among the new books translated into English is also the anthology of current Slovak prose selected and translated by Magdalena Mullek and Júlia Sherwood.