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No trouble in Berg refugee camp at Austrian-Slovak border

NO violations involving asylum seekers in the refugee camp in the Austrian village of Berg, at the Austrian-Slovak border, have been recorded, Berg mayor Georg Hartl informed the TASR newswire on October 29.

Bratislava Self-Governing Region head Pavol Frešo and Berg mayor Georg Hartl(Source: SITA)

“There haven’t been any difficulties so far,” Hartl told TASR, adding that there are about 55-60 refugees staying there.

Read also: Read also:Interior Minister surprised by news of refugee camp close to Austrian border

The asylum seekers will stay in Berg until the end of their asylum procedure, which is to take six months at most.

A number of volunteers are dealing with the asylum seekers, helping them with German language lessons, for example. Asylum seekers that are accommodated in Berg are also participating in events organised by the village or by various associations, according to him.

“They are very friendly and helpful,” said Hartl, as quoted by TASR.

At the moment they are not carrying out any public works, but that does not depend on them, but on the capacity of the village’s staff resources and on the season of the year, according to Hartl, adding that the municipality is working on such an option.

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