Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Parliament passes new law on public procurement

THE SLOVAK Parliament has passed a new law on public procurement on November 18, thereby implementing three new European directives on public procurement from last year.

ÚVO building(Source: Sme)

The main goals of the new directives are to make the procedures of public procurement more effective and faster through obligatory electronisation, greater flexibility and reduction of the administrative burden, as well as simplifying access to the market for small and medium-sized enterprises, stated the Public Procurement Office (ÚVO) which had proposed the bill as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The directives also introduce several new phenomena, like an innovative partnership on assigning the orders; stipulated rules for potential conflict of interests, so-called in-house orders, and direct payments to sub-contractors, as well as defining the reasons for backing out of a contract.

ÚVO chairwoman Zita Táborská last week said that it is easier and more fitting to pass a completely new law on public procurement. The speeding-up, simplifying, and abolition of red tape should be ensured by total electronisation; sub-contractors will have to be identified in offers, as well as in contracts with suppliers.

The law was passed by 76 votes of the ruling Smer party. The deadline for adoption of EU directives on public procurement – except for provisions with a longer deadline – expires on April 17, 2016; while the new law shall become effective on April 18. The current law dates back to 2006 and has been amended 26 times so far.

 

Topic: Economics


Top stories

Slovakia remains unknown in convention business

Ten MICE events in 2017 should bring almost €6.5 million to Bratislava.

The GLOBSEC security forum is one of the regular MICE events in Slovakia since 2005.

Kotleba should be defeated in election, not banned

More constitutional can be less democratic, and it is not clear that it always has the intended result. Perhaps the clearest historical case came with the rise of the Nazis in Germany.

Marian Kotleba

Slovakia to leave NATO is a hoax

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes that appeared over the past week.

Some peple gathered at Slavin in Bratislava brought ani-NATO banners.

Fico: We cannot allow multi-speed EU to become divisive Video

Final session of the 12th edition of Globsec 2017 featured Slovak PM Robert Fico, Czech PM Bohuslav Sobotka, and President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, in a panel entitled European (Dis)Union?

Donald Tusk, Robert Fico, and Bohuslav Sobotka (left to right)