WSJ: Weapons for terrorists maybe bought in Slovakia

GERMAN police officers have detained an arms dealer from Magstadt who is suspected of selling weapons to the terrorists behind the attacks in Paris. Some weapons may have been bought in Slovakia, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Illegal arms keep surfacing in Slovakia as well. Illustrative stock photo Illegal arms keep surfacing in Slovakia as well. Illustrative stock photo (Source: SITA)

The WSJ wrote on November 27 that a store in the basement of a Soviet-style building in the western Slovak town of Partizánske has been selling deactivated weapons and replica Nazi uniforms to private collectors or for use as movie props.

It has also been a source for weapons that, according to European security officials, were later reactivated and used by jihadists in at least two terror attacks in Europe: the attack on the Charlie Hebdo editorial staff at beginning the year and also the failed attempt on a train, prevented by off duty US Navy officers. A German trader also sold four assault rifles, two AK-47 and two Zastavas M70, the German tabloid Bild wrote.

Slovak representatives have, however, already denied such claims. Slovak security forces are currently checking the information from their partner organisations abroad that may be linked to the terrorist attacks in Paris. The aim is to reveal the people and also materials used in the attack, as well as the whole logistic structure of the attackers, Interior Ministry spokesperson Ivan Netík told the Nový Čas tabloid daily.

The link between the detained German man currently in custody in Stuttgart and the arms used in the attacks has not been officially confirmed yet, Slovak newswires wrote, citing the Reuters newswire. 

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