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Slovak to chair NEA committee

THE HEAD of the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Marta Žiaková, is now presiding over the Steering Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), part of the OECD.

Marta Žiaková(Source: Sme)

She was selected in Paris as its chairwoman on October 30, the Slovak Economy Ministry informed the TASR newswire.

This is the first time that a representative of the Visegrad Group region (Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary) has been selected to chair the committee.

The Steering Committee is the supreme body with decision making powers for all NEA member states. In cooperation with five vice-chairs (from the Republic of Korea, Japan, the USA, France and Belgium), Žiaková will coordinate the practical activities of the NEA secretariat.

In 2014-2015, Žiaková chaired the Council of Governors of the International Agency for Atomic Energy in Vienna, and since 2012, she had been vice-chair of the NEA Steering Committee.

NEA OECD was founded in 1958 and currently has 31 country members. Slovakia has been a member since 2002. The agency helps its members to develop scientific, technological and legal foundations necessary for the safe, economical and environmentally favourable use of nuclear energy for peaceful goals.

Topic: Energy


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