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Most Slovaks own their housing

NINE in ten Slovaks own the place they live in, which ranks it the second highest in the European Union.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

As many as 90.3 percent of Slovakia’s inhabitants are living in their own house or flat, according to the data published by Eurostat. The only country where the share is higher is Romania with 96.1 percent. Slovakia is then followed by Lithuania (89.9 percent), Croatia (89.7 percent), and Hungary (89.1 percent), the TASR newswire reported.

In average, 70.1 percent of Europeans live in their own house or flat, while 29.9 percent rent their homes. Among the countries where less than two-thirds of people live in their own home are Germany (52.5 percent), Austria (57.2 percent), Denmark (63.3 percent), and the United Kingdom (64.8 percent), TASR wrote.

The Eurostat data suggests that nearly 60 percent of EU inhabitants lived in houses and 40 percent lived in flats in 2014. The most people living in houses are in the UK, Croatia and Belgium, while flats are preferred in Latvia, Lithuania and Greece.

As many as 11.4 percent of EU inhabitants on average spend more than 40 percent of their salary on housing, while in Slovakia it is only 9 percent.

The most overcrowded households are in Romania (52.3 percent), Hungary and Poland (about 44 percent). In Slovakia it is 38.6 percent of people, TASR wrote.

The satisfaction with housing is the greatest in Finland, Denmark and Sweden; and the lowest in Bulgaria, Latvia and Greece. Slovaks with 7.6 points out of 10 achieve the EU average (7.5 points).

Topic: Real Estate


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