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Book price round up proves success

DOBRÝ Anjel (Good Angel), a non-profit organisation, got a quarter of a million euros from Slovaks after the online bookshop Martinus.sk began giving customers the option to round up book prices and donating the difference.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

This charity was launched in 2011, and by October 2015, people contributed more than €250,000 through the project called Anjelské drobné/Angelic Small Change.

“We are very glad that this idea has been so successful; and we continue to be enormously thankful to all book readers for their constant support,” Dobrý Anjel head Ján Dobák said, as quoted by the SITA newswire. On the occasion of announcing this sum, he also informed that the Martinus bookshop is launching the option to round off the book price also in brick and mortar stores. Each donor will see exactly the sum they contribute to Dobrý Anjel when buying a book.

The charity is a humanitarian system of civic financial aid helping with regular monthly contributions to families with children where fathers, mothers or any of the children suffer from cancer or other grave illness like polio, cystic fibrosis, or chronic kidney failure. With dozens of thousands of donors – good angels – relatively small monthly contributions are made to about 3,000 affected families.

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