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Fairtrade unknown to Slovaks

SLOVAKS do not know the Fairtrade mark, which seeks to sell products and other goods at a price that offers farmers in developing and poor countries a chance to make a living from their production.

Coffee is one of the goods sold within the Fairtrade scheme.(Source: Sme)

This stems from the poll published by the Fairtrade International organisation, the SITA newswire reported.

Just 14 percent of Slovaks came across the sign last year, which most frequently marks coffee, tea, chocolate, cosmetics and clothes. In the neighbouring Czech Republic the familiarity was wider, 33 percent.

As the head of Fairtrade Czech and Slovak Republics, Hana Chorváthová, informed the revenues from products certified Fairtrade last year represented €1.1 million in Slovakia. This is significantly less than in the Czech Republic, where Fairtrade products worth €8.5 million were sold.

In total about 1.5 million farmers and producers from 75 countries are registered within the global Fairtrade scheme. They produce about 30,000 products under Fairtrade conditions.

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Topic: Corporate Responsibility


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