Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Little Jesus busy reading letters sent via Christmas mail

Ježiško has received letters from Japan, Kazakhstan, Iceland, Macao and more.

Cyclist Peter Sagan (l) launched the 17th annual Christmas post on November 6 in Rajecká Lesná. (Source: TASR)

In Slovakia it is Little Jesus or Ježiško, who brings Christmas presents to children who have an opportunity each year to write a letter with Christmas presents. This year Ježiško received more than 90,000 letters at his 999 99 postcode as part of the 17th annual Christmas Mail service of the Slovak Post Office, with letters sent by children and adults from Slovakia and by Slovaks all over the world. Via his mailbox in Rajecká Lesná (Žilina region), Ježiško has received letters from Japan, Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Singapore, Kazakhstan, Iceland and Macao, the TASR newswire reported.

“Around 2,500 letters came from abroad,” said Slovak Post Office spokesperson Stanislava Pondelová.

The first letter originating from Slovakia under the Christmas Mail service was sent by a five-year-old boy who wanted to find a Lego set under the Christmas tree. The first letters from abroad came from faraway Taiwan. The children gave thanks for their family and asked for air tickets to Slovakia.

Children most often ask for toys, including Legos and dolls, live animals, musical instruments and touch screen phones. Ježiško responded to the foreign letters in English and to sight-impaired children in Braille. A small gift was included in all letters with a valid sender’s address.

Over the previous 16 years of the Christmas Mail service, more than 1.4 million letters with wishes from all over the world have been sent to Ježiško.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovakia has many skilful people. Students should meet them

The new project by the Pontis Foundation tries to motivate young people through stories of successful business people.

The presentation of This is 21 project

Big cities chose new way of doing politics

But Robert Fico sticks stubbornly to old-style approach.

How does Slovakia support innovations?

Companies operating in Slovakia can benefit from state subsidies, EU resources and venture capital funds.

Science in Slovakia is underfunded, lagging behind other European countries.

Slovaks speak the worst English in central Europe

Seven out of ten job applicants in Slovakia claim to speak English.

Illustrative Stock Photo