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Agriculture key for the future

BOTH SLOVAKS and Europeans as a whole regard agriculture as an important sector for the future.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

This stems from the findings of a Eurobarometer survey conducted by the European Commission. The survey was carried out in October and collected the views of 27,000 EU citizens, the TASR newswire reported, referring to the report of the Slovak Agriculture and Food Chamber (SPPK).

Over 90 percent of Europeans consider agriculture and rural areas to be key for the future of Europe. The same is true for 76 percent of Slovaks, which is 13 percentage points more than in a similar survey in 2013.

Meanwhile, 55 percent of Slovaks surveyed believe that the fundamental obligations of farmers include ensuring varied and high-quality products for people. Thirty-two percent believe that the basic roles also include ensuring food self-sufficiency for the EU.

As for the chief roles of EU policies in agriculture and rural development, 62 percent of Slovaks indicated that those should include ensuring appropriate prices of foodstuffs for consumers.

SPPK has consistently been highlighting the societal need for presence of the agriculture and food industry, said its chair Milan Semančík.

“It’s necessary to always emphasise the significant role that farmers play in ensuring high-quality, healthy and safe foodstuffs,” Semančík said, as quoted by TASR, adding that taking care of the countryside and the environment in the development of rural areas and in employment are also important.

Topic: European Union


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