Bratislava gears up to help homeless in freezing temps

The capital is ready to set up a tent camp or arrange for the opening of railway station waiting rooms to shelter the homeless.

(Source: Sme)

In an effort to help homeless people cope with their plight on freezing streets, the city of Bratislava is ready to set up a tent camp or arrange for the opening of railway station waiting rooms to shelter the homeless. Weather forecasts indicate freezing temperatures for this week.

“While the situation shouldn’t be critical in Bratislava, we do not want to underestimate anything,” said Bratislava Mayor Ivo Nesrovnal as cited by the TASR newswire.

Nesrovnal spoke after city hall officials met on January 15 with representatives of homelessness outreach and street work organisations. With an eye towards setting up the tent camp, Nesrovnal has also talked to Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák.

“The (Interior) Ministry is ready to help City Hall,” said Nesrovnal.

City Hall is operating a shelter called Mea Culpa with 36 beds, where an extra nine beds can be added. The Vincent St. Paul shelter is capable of adding an extra 70-80 beds on top of its regular capacity of 200 beds.

“If the additional beds aren’t enough or if the temperature dips below minus 10 degrees Celsius for a longer period of time, City Hall is ready to set up a tent camp,” according to Bratislava City Hall.

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